excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 695 (171 words)

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 695 (171 words)

part of

Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

695

type

text excerpt

encoded value

In 1833 a German opera corps came to London, and performed the Freischütz of Weber, and the Fidelio of Beethoven, in the original language. Perhaps no circumstance has tended to improve our theatrical music so much as the visit of these Germans. The excellence of their performance was to be attributed to the taste and skill of the conductor. Heretofore our bands have been led and directed by the first violin, who, when difficulties occurred, desisted from playing, and, by the flourish of his bow, endeavoured to keep his troops together. On the appearance of a new opera, the person who presided at the piano-forte had the charge of the chorus, so that the two directors were often beating two different times. Besides the movement being thus tortured, the superior execution of the first violin was withdrawn at the moment it was most needed. The German method has put an end to these ridiculous exhibitions, by placing a person of taste and talent in front, who directs every movement and expression.

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excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 695 (171 words)

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1435440950227

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