excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 772-3 (108 words)

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 772-3 (108 words)

part of

Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

772-3

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The form of the service is precisely that of the old Presbyterians in England, in all respects the opposite to that of the episcopal church. The music, I ought to say singing, was execrable ; the first tune was begun by the clerk alone, the congregation falling in at the second line. All sorts of voices and sounds were blended together in unparalleled dissonance. The tune was Milton, in the key of G, and at the end of each line the tune fell a quarter of a note, so that by the time they drawled it out to the end of the verse, it had sunk to E flat.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 772-3 (108 words)

1435608768292:

reported in source

1435608768292

documented in
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