excerpt from 'Musical letters from Abroad' pp. 18-9 (153 words)

excerpt from 'Musical letters from abroad' pp. 18-9 (153 words)

part of

Musical letters from Abroad

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

18-9

type

text excerpt

encoded value

We were now permitted to follow, or rather to precede the children to their dining room. We took our stand in the boys’ room, and in a few minutes the two hundred little fellows marched into the room, and took their places at the tables in most perfect order. Four of the larger boys had clarionets in their hands, and, on a signal being given, the whole company folded their hands and shut their eyes and sang a grace, accompanied by the clarionets. This was the most affecting song of the day; it was indeed much aided by sight, but the effect was to "enforce tears" from many an eye. This being over, the music of knives and forks was heard — and the nice roast beef and boiled potatoes appeared to be gratefully, or certainly gladly received. We also passed through the girls’ room, and saw them at their dinner.

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excerpt from 'Musical letters from Abroad' pp. 18-9 (153 words)

excerpt from 'Musical letters from abroad' pp. 18-9 (153 words)

1448274893770:

reported in source

1448274893770

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