excerpt from 'Musical letters from Abroad' pp. 40-41 (248 words)

excerpt from 'Musical letters from abroad' pp. 40-1 (248 words)

part of

Musical letters from Abroad

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urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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40-1

40-41

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Mad. Sontag is gone, and the Gewandhaus Orchestra is thrown upon its own strength and resources; but it fails not, neither is it faint or weary. The Eighteenth Concert was (save the charming singer) one of the very best of the season. The Orchestra (said one who has often heard) never played better; well might they feel the inspiration of their author, for they played Beethoven's 4th Symphonic, than which he has not written a better. It is not so well known in America, but it cannot rank second to anything which Beethoven has composed.

The adagio (sextuple movement) is as perfect in design and as beautiful in coloring as in any work of musical art. Fraulein Anna Klassig sang a Recitative and Arie from Sphor's Jessonda. Herr G. Kruger, from Stuttgart, played two pieces well on the Harp; and a well-trained choir, Pauliner Sänger-Vereins, of fifty men’s voices sung three pieces, two of which were by Mendelssohn, and one of which may be found in the “Fireside Harmony” (Waserfahrt.) Mendelssohn’s Overture "Melusine," as fine an Overture as exists, was played; and the performance was worthy of the composition.

These Concerts are very popular and fashionable. The Musical Professors are all there, expectation is fully awake, and I believe almost always fully gratified.

Mad. Sontag has left Leipzig for Dresden, where she will undoubtedly create as great a sensation as she has here. I hope to notice her more particularly hereafter.

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excerpt from 'Musical letters from Abroad' pp. 40-41 (248 words)

excerpt from 'Musical letters from abroad' pp. 40-1 (248 words)

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