excerpt from 'Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4' pp. 14-15 (312 words)

excerpt from 'Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4' pp. 14-15 (312 words)

part of

Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

14-15

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Among the singers in Italy Carlo Broschi, also called Farinelli, indisputably makes the greatest figure for the fineness and modulation of his voice. He is master of twenty-three different notes or gradations of voice ; and as it is universally allowed that he excels all other singers, this extraordinary talent is said to have been bestowed on him by the virgin Mary, as a grateful return for the extraordinary adoration which Farinelli's mother constantly paid to her. He is now in the twenty-third year of his age ; so that he may possibly improve, and even surpass his present skill.

Next to Farinelli for a graceful manner, propriety of gestures, and strength of voice, Giovanni Caristini deserves to be mentioned ; and after him Senesino, Giacinto Fontana, otherwise called Farfarello, Gaetano, Majorano, called Caffarello, Angelo Amerovoli, Nicolini, Gaetano Valletto di Milano, &c. Care has been taken that none of these famous singers should be disfigured with a beard; however, their smooth faces, with their shrill and effeminate voice, seem to be something out of character, when they make their appearance on the stage like warlike heroes, animating their troops to second their bravery. But we must observe that opera's are not calculated to please the judgment, but to tickle the ear ; so that propriety of characters is as little to be expected in these pieces, as sublime and poetical language. The music of the airs is often composed before the words; and the author is sometimes obliged, in certain syllables pointed out to him, to introduce a word which has the vowels e or a ; those vowels being the two sounds on which a good voice can best display its strength and variety of modulations.

 It is certain that no language is so well adapted to music as the Italian, on account of its using so many vowels in proportion to the number of consonants.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Travels through Germany, Bohemia, Switzerland, Italy and Lorrain. Vol. 4' pp. 14-15 (312 words)

1509017636647:

reported in source

1509017636647

documented in
Page data computed in 340 ms with 1,657,904 bytes allocated and 35 SPARQL queries executed.