excerpt from 'The Twenty-three years, or the late way of life' pp. 17-19 (157 words)

excerpt from 'The Twenty-three years, or the late way of life' pp. 18-20 (157 words)

part of

The Twenty-three years, or the late way of life

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

17-19

18-20

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[Joseph Armitage grew up in Hunslet, Leeds with his stepbrother George and his mother and father, Rachel and Henry Armitage. His father was a steel worker at various steel works]

 

At this point I will interrupt my description of our new home and surroundings, with a description of one feature of our everyday life that has now [1970s] gone for ever. That feature was the street traders, or “Hawkers” as they were known to everybody.

[…]

 

One could almost tell the time of day (or night as the case may be) by the different shouts, because in most cases they hawked in a certain district at a certain time on certain days.

[…]

 

[…] Later in the evening came the tripe man. He had a two wheeled cart with a roof on in which a paraffin lamp hung swinging about as the pony walked along. He sold cow heel and tripe and rang a bell shouting “Tri-i-ipe an’ Cow ‘eel”. 

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excerpt from 'The Twenty-three years, or the late way of life' pp. 17-19 (157 words)

excerpt from 'The Twenty-three years, or the late way of life' pp. 18-20 (157 words)

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1535546171469

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