excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 177-178 (208 words)

excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 177-178 (208 words)

part of

A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

177-178

type

text excerpt

encoded value

There is […] a lady of an amiable character, Signora Corilla, whose extempore productions, which she repeats in the most graceful manner, are admired by people of real taste. While we were at Rome, this lady made an appearance one evening at the assembly of the Arcadi, which charmed a very numerous company […] 

[…] She began, accompanied by two violins, and sung her unpremeditated strains with great variety of thought and elegance of language. The whole of her performance lasted above an hour, with three or four pauses, of about five minutes each, which seemed necessary, more that she might recover her strength and voice, than for recollection; for that gentleman said, that nothing could have more the air of inspiration, or what we are told of the Pythian Prophetess. At her first setting out, her manner was sedate, or rather cold; but gradually becoming animated, her voice rose, her eyes sparkled, and the rapidity and beauty of her expressions and ideas seemed supernatural. She at last called on another member of the society to sing alternately with her, which he complied with; but Mr. Ramsay thought, though they were Arcades ambo, they were by no means cantare pares. [Both Arcadians, but not equally skilled in singing]

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excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 177-178 (208 words)

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