excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 78-79 (202 words)

excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 78-79 (202 words)

part of

A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

78-79

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Though the serious opera is in highest estimation, and more regularly attended by people of the first fashion; yet the opera buffas, or burlettas, are not entirely neglected, even by them, and are crowded, every night, by the middle and lower classes. Some admired singers have performed there during the Carnival, and the musical composers have rendered them highly pleasing to the general taste. 

The serious and burlesque operas prevail infinitely over the other theatrical entertainments at Rome, in spite of the united efforts of Harlequin, Pantaloon, and Punchinello. 

The prohibition of female performers renders the amusement of the Roman theatre very insipid, in the opinion of some unrefined Englishmen of your acquaintance who are here. In my own poor opinion, the natural sweetness of the female voice is ill supplied by the artificial trills of wretched castratos; and the awkward agility of robust sinewy fellows dressed in women's clothes, is a most deplorable substitution for the graceful movements of elegant female dancers. Is not the horrid practice which is encouraged by this manner of supplying the place of female singers, a greater outrage on religion and morality, than can be produced by the evils which their prohibition is intended to prevent?

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excerpt from 'A View of Society and Manners in Italy. Volume 2' pp. 78-79 (202 words)

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