excerpt from 'Miles To Go: The Lost Years: An Intimate Memoir of Life on the Road with Miles Davis' pp. 67-68 (147 words)

excerpt from 'Miles To Go: The Lost Years: An Intimate Memoir of Life on the Road with Miles Davis' pp. 67-68 (147 words)

part of

Miles To Go: The Lost Years: An Intimate Memoir of Life on the Road with Miles Davis

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

67-68

type

text excerpt

encoded value

[...] Al Foster was always his [Miles Davis’s] key player. Al's eyes would never leave Miles: He was attentive to every small gesture, every indication in Miles's facial nuances that he was about to go this way or that. In essence, he translated Miles to the band, effortlessly taking them where the leader was heading. He also acted as a deacon to Miles's preacher, cajoling, exhorting, and rewarding Miles verbally as Miles played. Often, when Miles would bring the band down way low and go into one of his glorious soft solos, all you could hear would be Miles's seductive muted trumpet and Al's voice, softly pleading like a woman to her lover, "Oh, Miles, yes. Miles, Miles, Miles." Miles would finish the solo, turn to Al and raise his eyebrows and smile, as if to say, "I really did do good there, didn't I”?

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excerpt from 'Miles To Go: The Lost Years: An Intimate Memoir of Life on the Road with Miles Davis' pp. 67-68 (147 words)

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