excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 9 (169 words)

excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 9 (169 words)

part of

Thirty Years of Musical Life in London

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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9

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text excerpt

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In later years Mme. Jenny Lind-Goldschmidt used to be a conspicuous figure at 
the concerts of the London Bach Choir, whereof her husband, Mr. Otto Goldschmidt,
was the first conductor. She would modestly take her place in the front row of the sopranos, with the most musical of the Queen's daughters, the Princess
Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, for her near companion. Moreover, she took an
active part in the training of the female voices, and to her skilful instruction
was in a large measure due the facility and brilliancy with which they executed
the difficult passages in Bach's B minor Mass (performed for the first time in
England April 26, 1876). The great singer died at Malvern, November 2, 1887,
and seven years later I was present at the unveiling of the tablet, with
medallion portrait, which now does honor to her memory in the south transept of
Westminster Abbey. She is so far the only musical artist, other than a composer,
whose lineaments have been exposed upon the walls of that ancient fane.

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excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 9 (169 words)

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