excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 35-36 (225 words)

excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 35-36 (225 words)

part of

Thirty Years of Musical Life in London

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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35-36

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text excerpt

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The master [Manuel Garcia] was then [in the 1870s] in his prime. For forty years his pupils, from Jenny Lind down, had included some of the best singers that Paris and London provided, while among the many aspirants for vocal fame who came to study with him at our house in Bentinck Street were several whose names yet enjoy a universal reputation. During the eight or ten years that he lived with us, I studied with him for nearly four, and heard him give many scores of lessons beside those which I received. To see and hear Garcia teach was ever a source of unqualified pleasure. Even when annoyed by a pupil's lack of ordinary intelligence, he seldom became abrupt or impatient; and he never worried or confused the student with technicalities not actually essential to the accurate understanding of his method. His voice had virtually gone, but he would liberally employ its beaux restes to impart he idea for the proper emission of a note or the phrasing of a passage. As often as not, the sounds that he produced would be positively ugly; but they never failed to convey the desired suggestion, and, though his own voice might tremble with sheer weight of years, he never, to my knowledge, brought out a pupil whose tones were marred by the slightest shade of vibrato.

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excerpt from 'Thirty Years of Musical Life in London, 1870-1900' pp. 35-36 (225 words)

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