excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 56 (151 words)

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 56 (151 words)

part of

Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

56

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text excerpt

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The winter of 1783 was so intense, and of such long continuance, that a party of the best skaiters got up a dramatic pantomime, which they performed upon the broad sweep of the river, opposite to the Bath gardens. Harlequin and Columbine were represented by the fleetest skaiters. They were followed by Pantaloon and Justice Guttle. There had been just established a set of noisy watchmen in the town, with their great coats, rattles, and lanthorns. These gentry formed part of the dramatis persona. Besides these were sailors, milkmaids, gipsies, and ballad singers, who sang and sold droll songs, written for the occasion. Nuns and friars were not forgotten. The devil pursuing the baker caused much laughter, as his satanic majesty, with his long tail rushed through the crowd. The characters were in masks and grotesquely dressed, and the harlequinade mightily pleased the spectators on the banks, who loudly applauded the scene.

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excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 56 (151 words)

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1433076942297

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