excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 302-303 (109 words)

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 302-303 (109 words)

part of

Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

302-303

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The most striking era in the history of music was the invention of the pianoforte [1700] ; before its introduction it might be said there was no domestic music, certainly no singing. The harpsichord was ill adapted to support the voice. Indeed, there was no music prepared for it. We heard nothing but sailors' rude songs, and galloping hunting songs, which the ladies were constrained to sing, for want of better music. The invention of the pianoforte, like the introduction of tea, softened the manners of the age, increased the refinement of the mind, and gave an elegance to society by the addition of the female voice to domestic vocal music.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Music and Friends: Or, Pleasant Recollections of a Dilettante' pp. 302-303 (109 words)

1433281968393:

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1433281968393

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