excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Mrs Stokes, 9 August 1786' pp. 167–168 (135 words)

excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Mrs Stokes, 9 August 1786' pp. 167–168 (135 words)

part of

Letter from Anna Seward to Mrs Stokes, 9 August 1786

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

167–168

type

text excerpt

encoded value

Yes, indeed, my expectations were more than answered by the abbey-music. In smaller scenes the single songs have certainly been heard to more advantage; but all that resulted from the blended harmony, both of voices and instruments, was above description, and beyond compare. The picturesque powers of some of the choruses seemed miraculous. Above all others, in that celebrated one from Israel in Egypt, which describes the return of the Red-sea over the host of Pharaoh. It is then that we felt the dire situation from the clang of the trumpets, the thunder of the drums, the sounds of wild dismay, which burst in vollies from every part of the vast orchestra, whilst a distinct melody was preserved amidst the fearful and mingled tones, as the horse and his rider were thrown into the sea.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Letter from Anna Seward to Mrs Stokes, 9 August 1786' pp. 167–168 (135 words)

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reported in source

1535637565558

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