excerpt from 'Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir' pp. 19 (116 words)

excerpt from 'Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir' pp. 19 (116 words)

part of

Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

19

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The painters of the fifties, including Jackson Pollock and Stuart Davis, were drawn to the clubs of Greenwich Village where bebop, the new jazz, was being played, where blacks and whites came together in racial harmony or at least in racial tolerance to each other. It's not hard to see why they were drawn to bebop with its dazzling speed and seemingly random, always electrically charged sounds. The musicians were doing in their way what the painters were doing on canvas. Each tried new techniques coming out of a time when America was transforming, when technology was slowly replacing tools, where computers were being introduced, where the norms of society no longer held the culture together

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Glorious Days and Nights: A Jazz Memoir' pp. 19 (116 words)

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1428141313063

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