excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 28-29 (202 words)

excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 28-29 (202 words)

part of

Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

28-29

type

text excerpt

encoded value

There are four convents in Venice, to which four hospitals are annexed, that give names to the convents. They are of a very singular institution in one article, being open to a certain number of poor young women, who are thoroughly instructed in both vocal and instrumental musick. They exhibit in their churches, on particular days of the week and some festivals, (to the public gratis,) and are much followed, as the performance is finer than one expects in any other place than a theatre. The terms upon which they accept their education, are, to remain in the convent until their talents shall induce some one to marry them. This happens very rarely, so that they generally sing on till their voices are lost, and their names are forgotten. The founders of this charity had, as it appears, too exalted an opinion of the power of musick; for, however beautiful the girls may be, they trust only to their melody, being intercepted from the sight of the audience, by a black gauze hung over the rails of the gallery in which they perform: It is transparent enough to shew the figures of women, but not in the least their features and complexion.

 

There are four convents in Venice, to which four hospitals are annexed, that give names to the convents. They are of a very singular institution in one article, being open to a certain number of poor young women, who are thoroughly instructed in both vocal and instrumental musick. They exhibit in their churches, on particular days of the week and some festivals, (to the public gratis,) and are much followed, as the performance is finer than one expects in any other place than a theatre. The terms upon which they accept their education, are, to remain in the convent until their talents shall induce some one to marry them. This happens very rarely, so that they generally sing on till their voices are lost, and their names are forgotten. The founders of this charity had, as it appears, too exalted an opinion of the power of musick; for, however beautiful the girls may be, they trust only to their melody, being intercepted from the sight of the audience, by a black gauze hung over the rails of the gallery in which they perform: It is transparent enough to shew the figures of women, but not in the least their features and complexion.

 There are four convents in Venice, to which four hospitals are annexed, that give names to the convents. They are of a very singular institution in one article, being open to a certain number of poor young women, who are thoroughly instructed in both vocal and instrumental musick. They exhibit in their churches, on particular days of the week and some festivals, (to the public gratis,) and are much followed, as the performance is finer than one expects in any other place than a theatre. The terms upon which they accept their education, are, to remain in the convent until their talents shall induce some one to marry them. This happens very rarely, so that they generally sing on till their voices are lost, and their names are forgotten. The founders of this charity had, as it appears, too exalted an opinion of the power of musick; for, however beautiful the girls may be, they trust only to their melody, being intercepted from the sight of the audience, by a black gauze hung over the rails of the gallery in which they perform: It is transparent enough to shew the figures of women, but not in the least their features and complexion.

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excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 28-29 (202 words)

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