excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 82 (130 words)

excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 82 (130 words)

part of

Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

82

type

text excerpt

encoded value

 

Notwithstanding the amazing noisiness of the audience, during the whole performance of the Opera, the moment the dances begin, there is a universal dead silence, which continues so long as the dances continue. Witty people, therefore, never fail to tell me, the Neapolitans go to see, not to hear an Opera. A stranger, who has a little compassion in his breast, feels for the poor singers, who are treated with so much indifference and contempt: He almost wonders that they can submit to so gross an affront; and I find, by their own confession, that however accustomed they be to it, the mortification is always dreadful, and they are eager to declare how happy they are when they sing in a country where more attention is paid to their talents.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Letters from Italy describing the customs and manners of that country, in the years 1765 and 1766' pp. 82 (130 words)

1509204582833:

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1509204582833

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