excerpt from 'Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story' pp. 141-142 (253 words)

excerpt from 'Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story' pp. 141-142 (253 words)

part of

Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

141-142

type

text excerpt

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Sam as an artist is very unique, because to me he wasn't a guy that sounded like Little Walter or that really big, heavy, heavy harmonica of Big Walter. He has his own little twist to things, kind of a country taste or flavor to it. He plays it with such different dynamics. I'm not sure I know exactly how to explain what he does or how he does it, but since he's been playing with this band he's kind of taken that country sound and electrified it. On a lot of his earlier recordings he'd just play straight harmonica into a bubble mic. In the later years with us he'd use a microphone, and it's a little bit bigger of a sound, but it's still not exactly the same kind of bigness as Little Walter. His sound is different; he's got his own phrasing with the harmonica. I find him very unique in that he's found a cross between the country sound and more of an electric sound. Kind of like Muddy did, when he was playing with a bottleneck by himself or with a really small band, and then there's the later Muddy with with electric guitar and a full-blown band. It's kind of the same kind of sound, but electrified; it sounds different. Sam has done the same kind of thing with his style. He's still playing the same way as his early stuff, but he's electrified it, and it's very unique to me. I think he's his own guy.

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excerpt from 'Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story' pp. 141-142 (253 words)

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