excerpt from 'Letter from Jeremy Bentham, late 1790–early 1791' pp. 212–213 (196 words)

excerpt from 'Letter from Jeremy Bentham, late 1790–early 1791' pp. 212–213 (196 words)

part of

Letter from Jeremy Bentham, late 1790–early 1791

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

in pages

212–213

type

text excerpt

encoded value

The business that you know of has led me of late to consult with an architect, a man of vertu, that other great men have consulted likewise. Calling at his house t’other day, by appointment, at half-past 12, no Mr. R. was there, nor was expected till 2. Instead of him, I was introduced to the pretty Mrs R., an old Constantinople acquaintance. He came in rather sooner than expected, and found us occupied— how do you think? Just as you and I might be: she at her pianoforte— I scraping upon a fiddle. He could not imagine who his wife had got with her. There were but two fiddle-players ever came there— Mr such-a-one and Mr such-a-one. And he knew that they were both at a great distance. Besides being pretty, which is nothing to anybody but her husband, and painting, and speaking all languages as well as any master ever heard, she plays upon the pianoforte beyond expression, which will doubtless give you satisfaction on account of my fondness for music, not to mention virtuous and accomplished pretty women, who are to me what pretty pictures are to your cold uncle.

appears in search results as

excerpt from 'Letter from Jeremy Bentham, late 1790–early 1791' pp. 212–213 (196 words)

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1515523728531

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