in District of Columbia - the 1920's

from His Eye Is On the Sparrow, pages 106-107:

Many Negro acts considered it a great honor to be asked to play the Sunday shows at the Howard. But others wouldn't work there because of a peculiar box-office rule of the management. For two evening performances and one matinee during the week they would sell tickets only to very light-colored Negroes. At those three performances you could see no black spots at all out front except when the lights were turned down. I thought this snobbish house policy--color discrimination against some of our own people by the dictys--ridiculous and laughable. But I played the Howard that Sunday anyway, …   more >>
cite as

Charles Samuels and Ethel Waters, His Eye Is On the Sparrow (1950), p. 106-107. https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/entity/lexp/1428234345070 accessed: 5 December, 2022

location of experience: District of Columbia

Listening to

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St. Louis Blues performed by Ethel Waters

Experience Information

Date/Time the 1920's
Medium live
Listening Environment in the company of others, indoors, in public

Originally submitted by Gill on Sun, 05 Apr 2015 12:45:45 +0100