Sam Myers in Chicago - the 1950's

from Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story, page 52:

Starting off in 1952, Elmore [James] was paying me thirty-five dollars a night, playing drums. During the whole time we worked together, I didn't blow much harp, which is what a lot of people look for me to do now, every time when they see me. I didn't blow harmonica on but two of his recordings. One was a big classic by him, "Look on Yonder Wall." That was on Fire and Fury, Bobby Robinson's label out of New York. We did that one in New Orleans. I played with him from '52 until '63, the time when he died.

"Dust My Broom" was actually a Robert Johnson song, but Elmore had made it …   more >>

cite as

Jeff Horton and Sam Myers, Sam Myers: The Blues is My Story (City of Jackson, 2006), p. 52. https://led.kmi.open.ac.uk/entity/lexp/1432633845997 accessed: 17 May, 2022

location of experience: Chicago

Listeners

Sam Myers
memoirist, vocalist, Musician
1936-2006

Listening to

hide composers
'Dust My Broom'
written by Robert Johnson
performed by Elmore James, Sam Myers

Experience Information

Date/Time the 1950's
Medium broadcast, live, playback
Listening Environment in the company of others, indoors, in public

Notes

Editor Jeff Horton writes: 'Sam was invited to join Elmore's peripatetic group as one of a revolving cast of studio and road drummers on the "Chittlin' Circuit." This was the name given to the loose route that black R&B and blues bands traveled in the 1950s and 1960s, mostly through the Deep South and as far north as Pittsburgh and Detroit. It involved moving from gig to gig in automobiles stuffed with instruments and luggage, and it was a hardscrabble existence for musicians who relied on word of mouth to persuade the next club or theater owner to book them for a night or two. Many owners would even pit one band against another in competitions to see who the crowd wanted to have back again.’ In addition, Sam Myers appeared on many hit records with Elmore James. Their association lasted until 1963, when Elmore passed away from a heart attack at the age of forty-five.


Originally submitted by 5011Henning on Tue, 26 May 2015 10:50:46 +0100
Approved on Tue, 11 Oct 2016 08:56:58 +0100