excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 300 (146 words)

excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 300 (146 words)

part of

Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character

original language

urn:iso:std:iso:639:ed-3:eng

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300

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text excerpt

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Beethoven, in particular, was always esteemed by him [Wagner] as  'the absolutely Unattainable and Inimitable,' whose compositions it was his greatest delight to conduct. I shall never forget Christmas Day, 1878. In celebration of his wife's birthday, Wagner had summoned the Meininger orchestra to Wahnfried, and rehearsed with its members several purely instrumental works, exclusively Beethoven's compositions. Whilst changing the parts, one of the executants happened to let fall a Beethoven book. As he was stooping to pick it up, Wagner jestingly exclaimed,  "Let it lie, it is of no importance. Our turn comes now; Offenbach and I, we only represent true art. What do we want with Beethoven!" His meaning, revealed by his tone and manner as he spoke, was plain enough to most of us; and yet there were those present who jumped to the conclusion that "Wagner thought and spoke scornfully of Beethoven!" 

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excerpt from 'Music and manners; personal reminiscences and sketches of character' pp. 300 (146 words)

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